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Tuesday, April 16

  1. msg Introductions message posted Introductions Use the News Feed to introduce yourself, start discussions, and manage your Classroom.
    Introductions
    Use the News Feed to introduce yourself, start discussions, and manage your Classroom.
    4:55 pm

Friday, June 17

Sunday, April 10

  1. page American Modernism Literary Works edited Only one student may sign up per poem. Since there are more students than short stories, all sho…

    Only one student may sign up per poem. Since there are more students than short stories, all short stories must be taken before two people are allowed to sign up for one short story.
    Poet
    Media
    Title of Work
    Student who will analyze
    Amy Lowell
    Poem
    A London Thoroughfare. 2 A.M.
    Amy Lowell
    Poem
    Astigmatism
    Amy Lowell
    Poem
    Opal
    Amy Lowell
    Poem
    Red Slippers
    Angelina Weld Grimke
    Poem
    The Black Finger
    Angelina Weld Grimke
    Poem
    Trees
    Arna Bontemps
    Poem
    A black man talks of reaping
    Carl Sandburg
    Poem
    Chicago
    Carl Sandburg
    Poem
    Honky Tonk in Cleveland, Ohio
    Carl Sandburg
    Poem
    I am the People, the Mob
    Claude McKay
    Poem
    If We Must Die
    Claude McKay
    Poem
    The Tropics in New York
    Countee Cullen
    Poem
    Any Human to Another
    Countee Cullen
    Poem
    Incident
    Dorothy Parker
    Poem
    The Waltz (in Norton Anthology Volume 2)
    e e cummings
    Poem
    o sweet spontaneous
    e e cummings
    Poem
    next to of course god america i
    e e cummings
    Poem
    Poem, Or Beauty Hurts Mr. Vinal
    e e cummings
    Poem
    Somewhere I have never travelled, gladly beyond
    e e cummings
    Poem
    Anyone lived in a pretty how town
    Edna St. Vincent Millay
    Poem
    Recuerdo
    Edna St. Vincent Millay
    Poem
    Apostrophe To Man
    Edna St. Vincent Millay
    Poem
    I Will Put Chaos Into Fourteen Lines
    Ezra Pound
    Poem
    The River-Merchant's Wife: A Letter
    Ezra Pound
    Poem
    To Whistler, American
    Ezra Pound
    Poem
    Villanelle: The Psychological Hour
    H.D.
    Poem
    Leda
    H.D.
    Poem
    At Baia
    Hart Crane
    Poem
    At Melville's Tomb
    Hart Crane
    Poem
    Chaplinesque
    Hart Crane
    Poem
    To Emily Dickinson
    Ishmael Reed
    Poem
    beware: do not read this poem
    James Weldon Johnson
    Poem
    My City
    John Crowe Ransom
    Poem
    Bells For John Whiteside's Daughter
    John Crowe Ransom
    Poem
    An American Addresses Philomela
    Langston Hughes
    Poem
    I, Too
    Langston Hughes
    Poem
    The Negro Speaks of Rivers
    Langston Hughes
    Poem
    When the Negro Was in Vogue
    Langston Hughes
    Poem
    Cross
    Langston Hughes
    Poem
    The Ballad Of The Landlord
    Louise Bogan
    Poem
    Evening in the Sanitorium
    Marianne Moore
    Poem
    Poetry
    Marianne Moore
    Poem
    The Paper Nautilus
    Mark Strand
    Poem
    Eating Poetry
    Randall Jarrell
    Poem
    The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner
    Robinson Jeffers
    Poem
    Shine, Perishing Republic
    Robinson Jeffers
    Poem
    Be Angry At The Sun
    Robinson Jeffers
    Poem
    Vulture
    T.S. Eliot
    Poem
    Gerontion
    T.S. Eliot
    Poem
    The Journey Of The Magi
    T.S. Eliot
    Poem
    Rhapsody On A Windy Night
    Wallace Stevens
    Poem
    Anecdote of the Jar
    Wallace Stevens
    Poem
    The High-Toned Old Christian Woman
    Wallace Stevens
    Poem
    Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird
    Wallace Stevens
    Poem
    Disillusionment of Ten O’Clock
    Wallace Stevens
    Poem
    Study of Two Pears
    William Carlos Williams
    Poem
    The Widow's Lament In Springtime
    William Carlos Williams
    Poem
    The Young Housewife
    William Carlos Williams
    Poem
    Landscape With The Fall Of Icarus
    Anzia Yezierska
    Short Story
    The Lost “Beautifulness”
    Bernard Malamud
    Short Story
    The Magic Barrel
    E.B. White
    Short Story
    The Second Tree From the Corner
    Elie Wiesel
    Short Story
    from All Rivers Run to the Sea
    Ernest Hemingway
    Short Story
    In Another Country
    Ernest Hemingway
    Short Story
    The Snows of Kilimanjaro (Norton Anthology)
    Eudora Welty
    Short Story
    A Worn Path
    Eudora Welty
    Short Story
    Petrified Man
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    Short Story
    Winter Dreams
    Flannery O’Connor
    Short Story
    The Life You Save May Be Your Own
    James Baldwin
    Short Story
    The Rock Pile
    James Thurber
    Short Story
    The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
    John Hersey
    Short Story
    from Hiroshima
    John Steinbeck
    Short Story
    Breakfast
    Katherine Anne Porter
    Short Story
    The Jilting of Granny Weatherall
    Richard Wright
    Short Story
    from Black Boy
    Sherwood Anderson
    Short Story
    The Egg
    Thomas Wolfe
    Short Story
    The Lost Boy
    William Faulkner
    Short Story
    A Rose for Emily
    William Faulkner
    Short Story
    Barn Burning (Norton Anthology)
    Zora Neale Hurston
    Short Story
    from Dust Tracks on a Road

    (view changes)
    6:39 pm
  2. page American Modernism Project edited ... Delete this text and replace it with your embed code for your video - be sure to use MLA paren…
    ...
    Delete this text and replace it with your embed code for your video - be sure to use MLA parenthetical citations and place your Works Cited list at the bottom of the page
    Write an essay discussing the following points:
    ...
    definition of Romanticism.Modernism.
    Show how the writer’s life affected his/her work.
    Show how the work compares in style, character, theme, etc. to other works by the author and to your other assigned work.
    Delete this text and replace it with your answer - be sure to use MLA parenthetical citations and place your Works Cited list at the bottom of the page
    Modernism Project
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="modernism" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Modernism Works
    Amy Lowell
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="lowell" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Angelina Weld Grimke
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    hideInternal="true" tag="grimke" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Arna Bontemps
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    hideInternal="true" tag="bontemps" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Carl Sandburg
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    hideInternal="true" tag="sandburg" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Claude McKay
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="mckay" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Countee Cullen
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="cullen" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Dorothy Parker
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="parker" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    e e cummings
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="cummings" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Edna St. Vincent Millay
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="millay" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Ezra Pound
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="pound" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    H.D.
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="hd" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Hart Crane
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="crane" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Ishmael Reed
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="reed" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    James Weldon Johnson
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="Johnson" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    John Crowe Ransom
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="ransom" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Langston Hughes
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="hughes" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Louise Bogan
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="bogan" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Marianne Moore
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="moore" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Mark Strand
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="strand" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Randall Jarrell
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="jarrell" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Robinson Jeffers
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="jeffers" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    T.S. Eliot
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="eliot" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Wallace Stevens
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="stevens" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    William Carlos Williams
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="williams" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Anzia Yezierska
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="yezierska" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Bernard Malamud
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="malamud" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    E.B. White
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="white" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Elie Wiesel
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="wiesel" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Ernest Hemingway
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="hemingway" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Eudora Welty
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="welty" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="fitzgerald" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Flannery O’Connor
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="oconnor" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    James Baldwin
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    hideInternal="true" tag="baldwin" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    James Thurber
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    hideInternal="true" tag="thurber" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    John Hersey
    ...
    tag="hersey " limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    John Steinbeck
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="steinbeck" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Katherine Anne Porter
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="porter" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Richard Wright
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="wright" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Sherwood Anderson
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="anderson" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Thomas Wolfe
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="wolfe" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    William Faulkner
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    hideInternal="true" tag="faulkner" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    Zora Neale Hurston
    ...
    hideInternal="true" tag="hurston" limit="10" ]]limit="10"]]
    (view changes)
    4:41 pm

Wednesday, January 5

  1. page The Darkened Mind by James Russell Lowell edited If a deep, emotional poem is what one seeks, he or she would need to look no further than a poem by…
    If a deep, emotional poem is what one seeks, he or she would need to look no further than a poem by Romanticism writer James Russell Lowell. A moody, almost dark poem, “The Darkened Mind” is a work of art that will have the reader captivated after just the first stanza. Clearly a work of Romanticism, the poem is focused heavily on emotions and is very descriptive. The life of James Russell Lowell might have had an impact on his writings style; he was born into a wealthy family, and he more than likely encountered times in which he realized that money and power did not equal happiness. His deep and soul-bearing style of writing is prevalent in more than just “The Darkened Mind;” it seems as if the emotional topics are quite common for him. A man who clearly focused more feelings than general outlooks, James Russell Lowell was a powerful Romanticism author whose haunting works continue to captivate readers even today.
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    around him (Lowell(Lowell, “The Darkened”).
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    little world (Lowell(Lowell, “The Darkened”).
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    of stone” (Lowell(Lowell, “The Darkened”).
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    darkened mind” (Lowell(Lowell, “The Darkened”).
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    trait of Romanticism.Romanticism (Langley). Romanticism is
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    in this poem.poem (Langley).
    Another characteristic
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    as a fact.fact (Langley). Lowell certainly
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    winter wind” (Lowell(Lowell, “The Darkened”).
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    prevalent in Romanticism.Romanticism (Langley).
    Lowell’s life
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    the individuals (Lowell(Lowell, “The Darkened”).
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    same time (Lowell(Lowell, “Love”). This
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    and thought (Lowell(Lowell, “Love”). This
    “The Darkened Mind” is an emotional poem that expresses how a man, even surrounded by friends, can feel incredibly alone. In writing this, James Russell Lowell portrayed many Romanticism traits. He focused on the emotions of the situation instead of giving just facts, and he went into incredible detail in order to make the story as vivid as possible. Possibly influenced by his childhood wealth, Lowell seemed to make it a point to ignore the roles of society and money in his writings. This theme is very common in other works by him as well, such as his poem “Love and Thought.” A haunting poem, “The Darkened Mind” is a well written example of true Romanticism.
    WORKS CITED
    Huff, Randall. "Lowell, James Russell." The Facts On File Companion to American Poetry, vol. 1. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2007. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&SID=5&iPin= CPAP0248&SingleRecord=True (accessed December 11, 2010).
    Langley, John. “Romanticism 1800-1860.” Mr. Langley's Digital Classroom. 24 Oct. 2010. Web. 08 Dec. 2010. <http://sites.google.com/site/mrlangleysroom/treasure-chest/presentations>. Microsoft Powerpoint File.
    Lowell, James Russel. “The Darkened Mind.” Read Book Online: Literature Books, novels, short Stories, fiction, non-fiction, Poems, essays, plays, Pulitzer Prize Nobel Prize. Readbookonline.net, 2010. Web. 08 Dec. 2010. http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/7267/
    Lowell, James Russel. “Love and Thought.” Read Book Online: Literature Books, novels, short Stories, fiction, non-fiction, Poems, essays, plays, Pulitzer Prize Nobel Prize. Readbookonline.net, 2010. Web. 11 Dec. 2010. <http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/7267/>
    (view changes)
  2. page Little Annie's Ramble by Nathaniel Hawthorne edited ... As people grow older, they tend to forget how pure and innocent it once was to be a child. In …
    ...
    As people grow older, they tend to forget how pure and innocent it once was to be a child. In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Little Annie’s Ramble,” Hawthorne reflects strongly on that thought. Clearly a work of Romanticism, the short story tells a tale of a man who befriends a little girl as they take a trip to the circus. Throughout the story, Hawthorne is using bright, colorful language, and he puts great emphasis on the sights they see around them. Nathaniel Hawthorne grew up in a family whose ancestors were part of the Salem witch trials (“Meet” 278). Because of this, Hawthorne strongly questioned what was right and what was wrong, leading him to write many stories that had a moral principle (“Meet” 278). It is very clear, while reading “Little Annie’s Ramble,” he is trying to show morals; Hawthorne discussed moralities several times throughout the story. In reading other stories by Hawthorne, it is obvious that there is a pattern to his writings; “The Minister’s Black Veil” portrays a story that is clearly much different than “Little Annie’s Ramble,” but it is told using the same writing method. It too, has an evident moral. Nathaniel Hawthorne is a man strongly influenced by his childhood who has written many great works of Romanticism; he presents a story that will make the reader think while also learning valuable morals regarding society.
    One of the key aspects of American Romanticism is “preferring youthful innocence to educated sophistication” (Langley). Hawthorne certainly portrayed that characteristic in his story “Little Annie’s Ramble.” The story begins with a man hearing the town crier’s announcement, declaring the arrival of the circus (Hawthorne “Little”). The man then sees a little girl, Annie, standing on her front step, looking eager to see what the crier had been speaking of. Walking up to Annie, the man holds out his hand, and together they begin to embark on an adventure, exploring the town and all the sights passing them by as they make their way to the circus. Although Annie never says a word, the man seems excessively overjoyed, as if just being with a young child is making himself a young boy again. Throughout the story, Hawthorne is incredibly descriptive of the child’s emotions and actions. For example, at one point, he and Annie see a street musician and Hawthorne describes how Annie’s eyes become bright with pleasure (Hawthorne “Little”). This example defines Romanticism even more as Hawthorne elaborates, explaining how Annie starts dancing to the music and expressing how as people get older they no longer are free to dance as Annie does. As he is describing the issues that cause older people to refrain from dancing, he says “(…) but many, many have leaden feet, because their hearts are far heavier than lead” (Hawthorne “Little”). This clearly depicts one of the strongest aspects of Hawthorne’s writing that categorizes him as a Romanticism author. Hawthorne is showing how the pure innocence of a child is so much greater than the thoughts and feelings of one as they age. As people get older, they become more prone to all the thoughts of others and the society; they begin to see the world as their leaders or government officials want them to see it. A child, however, experiences none of those sights. A child sees not what others see, but what they themselves see, and they are not afraid to express their emotions clearly and without doubt. The fact that Hawthorne puts incredible emphasis on this throughout the entire story shows how strongly Romanticism is being portrayed throughout it.
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    descriptive, flowery language.language (Langley). Hawthorne certainly
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    into incredible detail.detail (Langley). This trait
    Nathaniel Hawthorne’s childhood had a very great impact on his writing style. Hawthorne, who was born in Salem, had ancestors who were involved in the Salem witch trials; one of his relatives was even one of the judges who decided who would be hung (“Meet” 278). This had a big influence on Hawthorne as he was growing up. He spent much time as a child alone in the woods, thinking about complex scenarios in which morals were put to the test. Hawthorne would think through situations, trying to understand what decisions he felt would be right or wrong (“Meet” 278). This tendency is very evident in his writings. In “Little Annie’s Ramble,” Hawthorne discusses morals and decision-making quite often. For example, he writes, “So, come, Annie; but if I moralize as we go, do not listen to me; only look about you, and be merry!” (Hawthorne “Little”). The man says this to Annie at the beginning of the story, and, as he predicted, he does moralize as he goes. As he and Annie partake in their adventure, he often comments on how great the children are, how dirty the city is, and how peaceful life could be if nature was a bigger part of life instead of all of the technology that has evolved. This, too, shows his Romanticism traits; he put a large focus on how nature is not appreciated in the towns (Hawthorne “Little”). Throughout the entire story, Hawthorne focuses on the decisions being made by the man and Annie as well as the morality of society. Hawthorne provides reasoning for all of the man’s actions, such as why he randomly just took Annie to the circus without asking for permission or letting anyone know. An action that could have been viewed as disturbing or unsettling is actually justified for as Hawthorne explains that it is important to view life from a child’s eyes every once in a while; one needs to spend time with a child every now in then in order to remember their innocence and their purity (Hawthorne “Little”). Basically, throughout Little Annie’s Ramble, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s childhood shone through in that he would give justification for almost every decision made by the man. Knowing that Hawthorne spent so much time as a child trying to figure out justifications for certain situations, his writing style as an adult makes complete sense.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne does seem to have a distinct writing style that he continues to write in throughout many of his writings. As previously stated, he deals with morals and decision making throughout “Little Annie’s Ramble.” When reading “The Minister’s Black Veil,” also by Hawthorne, one would most likely realize that it too deals with morals. Although Hawthorne does not focus so much on the morals of the overall society throughout “The Minister’s Black Veil” as he does in “Little Annie’s Ramble,” he puts a heavy emphasis on the topic at the end of the story. As the minister is passing away, he expresses his disgust in the people in his town, explaining that once he began wearing the veil, everybody started treating him differently (Hawthorne “The Minister’s” 289). Nobody knew why he was wearing the veil; people he used to be friends with turned away in disgust just because of his black veil (Hawthorne “The Minister’s” 298). This displays Hawthorne’s taste of distinguishing from right and wrong, which was also used in “Little Annie’s Ramble.”
    (view changes)

Tuesday, January 4

  1. page Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan Poe edited ... the supernatural. Despite the sadness of the poem, Poe captures the emotions of the reader a…
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    the supernatural. Despite the sadness of the poem, Poe captures the emotions of the reader and shows that not all of the aspects of Romanticism can be classified as happy ones. Compared to
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    own life. Despite the sadness of the poem, Poe captures the emotions of the reader and shows that not all of the aspects of Romanticism can be classified as happy ones.
    Annabel Lee is poem that is very tragic, emotional, and descriptive. The narrator goes through the poem and describes his love (which began many years ago in an unnamed "kingdom by the sea"), Annabel Lee, her beauty, and then her death. At the beginning of the poem, the narrator says that he and Annabel lived happily many years ago by the sea, and they did not have to think about anything but their love for each other. Though they were young, their love for one another burned with such intensity that angels caused her death. When Annabel Lee tragically dies, the narrator says that the angels up in heaven were jealous of the love and happiness they shared, and therefore took Annabel Lee's life (Poe). It is very clear that the narrator's love for Annabel Lee is eternal, and their love is strong enough to extend beyond the grave. The narrator deeply believes that their souls are still entwined. Every night, he dreams of Annabel Lee and sees the brightness of her eyes in the stars, even admitting that every night he lies down by her side in her tomb by the sea (Poe).
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    for the better.better (Langley). More focus
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    uplifting and beautiful.beautiful (Langley).
    Dark Romanticism is much more captivating than traditional Romanticism. The reader’s attention is held through intense intrigue, mystery, and dread of the terrible possibilities that could arise in the story (“Romanticism”). Another stark difference between the styles of Romanticism and Dark Romanticism is the way that the qualities of nature in the story are used. In Romanticism, authors like William Bryant Cullen and Ralph Waldo Emerson used nature to convey its’ beauty and the importance of self-reliance. Nature was valued for its physical beauty in poems like “Thanatopis” and essays like “Nature”, but was also revered for its ability to allow man the chance to be free from society and its influences (Emerson). Nature also plays a role in works of Dark Romanticism, but in a much different way. Authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe use nature as to set the scene, make it more mysterious, and give the story a more raw and sinister edge. In Dark Romanticism works, nature is not praised for its beauty but regarded as daunting and unpleasant and captivatingly mysterious.
    Much like his dark poems and stories, Edgar Allan Poe is seen as a very morbid, disturbing, and most of all, mysterious man. Poe is portrayed in this light because there were a lot of troubling times in his life that influenced his original and acclaimed writing style. The first of his troubles began when he turned to gambling, which is usually seen as a character fault (“Poe’s Life”). Poe had flaws, just like the characters in his stories. Poe experienced a lot of hardships in his life. His mother, father, brother, foster mother, and wife died before he did, which definitely influenced the dark, sad side of his writing. Annabel Lee was heavily influenced by the early death of his wife, Virginia (“Poe’s Life”). "It was many and many a year ago, in a kingdom by the sea, there was a maiden who you may know, by the name of Annabel Lee; and this maiden she lived with no other thought than to love and be loved by me" (Poe). The death of his young wife greatly swayed the style of his writing, most notably in the poem Annabel Lee, which was the last complete poem that written by Poe (Griswold). In the poem, Poe talks about the love he and his wife shared, her beauty, and the immense loss that he experienced in the event of her death (Poe).
    ...
    Kartha, Deepa. "Romanticism: Characteristics of Romanticism." Intelligent Life on the Web. Web. 9 Dec. 2010.
    http://www.buzzle.com/articles/romanticism-characteristics-of-romanticism.html.
    Langley, John. "Romanticism." Google Docs. Web. 04 Jan. 2011.
    <http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxtcmxhbmdsZXlzcm9vbXxneDoxNjk3NDFmZjlhMzkyYzNk>.

    Poe, Edgar Allan. "Annabel Lee." Poem Hunter. Web. 9 Dec. 2010.
    http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/annabel-lee/.
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    4:53 pm
  2. page My Low and Humble Home by Nathaniel Hawthorne edited Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote many different works, and they were all equally important to the history …
    Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote many different works, and they were all equally important to the history of writing. He added a lot to writing styles at the time, and he continues to be used today. He thought a lot about darker human traits and he was not afraid to show it. It also showed through in his writing, and it is still clearly portrayed today. Nathaniel Hawthorne gave the Romanticism period a lot to think about by writing very creatively.
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    war hero (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). This young
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    about it (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). He was
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    very best (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). The poem
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    up battlefields (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). The narrator
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    times sharper (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). War was
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    doing it (My).(Hawthonre, "My"). He quickly
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    the army (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). He realized
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    go back (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). He learned
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    him happy (My).(Hawthorne, "My").
    "My Low and Humble Home" is not an incredibly long poem, but it has a deep meaning and shows very well the style of Hawthorne's writing. The poem talks about the glory that the narrator thought he could get in the military and how he went with his intuition in joining. He did not necessarily think it all through, he thought to what it could bring him. He also was very youthful when he signed up, and the actions of war excited him, which happen much more in younger people than in older people. He was a hero to many people since he made it so far up in the military. His heroism was based on his youthful actions. He also figured out in the end that he really wanted to be in his childhood home, which falls in line with people looking behind them to find wisdom instead of looking forward to progress.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne endured many hardships over the course of his life, possibly the greatest of which was his father dying while Hawthorne was still very young (Liukkonen). Hawthorne was most likely devastated by this loss, and that could have had a big part in his writing of "My Low and Humble Home". He also could have thought about his mother, and he could have missed her a great deal, causing his inspiration for the poem. Hawthorne also struggled in getting his poems written and published (Liukkonen). He may have dealt with a lot of failure, and may have wanted to write something that at least portrayed the main hero to be successful. He could have shaped the main character to have some of his traits, or he may have based them off of stories told to him by family members or friends. Hawthorne did a very good job in writing "My Low and Humble Home", even while he had to suffer so many blows to his confidence.
    ...
    Higginbotham's Catastrophe" (Mr.).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Both stories
    Hawthorne was a very creative author that added a lot to the Romanticism period. He brought unique views and standpoints, while still making his works interesting enough that they were sold. He added morals in stories, and he tried to make the world a better place by getting rid of hypocrisy. Hawthorne was not always popular, but he always persevered and continued on until he got what he wanted. He was a great man and author, and many people still look up to him today.
    Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe." Free Classic Books Online at Classic Reader. Web. 06 Dec. 2010. <http://www.classicreader.com/book/197/1/>.
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  3. page Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe by Nathaniel Hawthorne edited Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a number of works, including many short stories, novels, and poems. He wa…
    Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a number of works, including many short stories, novels, and poems. He was greatly affected by events in his life and some of the people that he met and was involved with. He leaned toward the side of Dark Romanticism, because he saw the guilty and sinful side of people. He was a complex man, because he agreed with different writing styles over the course of his life, but that could have happened because his perspective changed. His stories helped set a precedent for Dark Romanticism, and many people can draw off of his works.
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    outrageous story (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). He is
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    latest news (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). One day,
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    the road (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The peddler
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    his orchard (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The peddler,
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    the town (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). They all
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    still alive (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The farmer
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    that morning (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Dominicus became
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    next morning (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). He then
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    the road (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Dominicus calls
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    Mr. Higginbotham (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The black
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    his orchard (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Dominicus takes
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    story everywhere (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). This city
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    cotton mills (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). They come
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    so upset (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Soon, the
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    Mr. Higginbotham (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The people
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    lady swoons (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The lawyer
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    were saying (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). They tell
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    be true (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). He says
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    night before (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Quickly, the
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    Higginbotham's niece (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). She said
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    her trip (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The people
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    with Dominicus (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The young
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    road again (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). He soon
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    eight o'clock (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). He realized
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    pear tree (Hawthorne)!(Hawthorne, "Mr.")! Dominicus rushed
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    the Irishman (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). The confusion
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    more believeable (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Dominicus appeared
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    Higginbotham's life (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Mr. Higginbotham
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    come to (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). They got
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    the interest (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr."). Eventually Mr.
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    tobacco factory (Hawthorne).(Hawthorne, "Mr.").
    This work definitely fits under the category of Romanticism, and some people may even put it under Dark Romanticism. "Mr Higginbotham's Catastrophe" shows many of the characteristics of Romanticism, which can be seen in every sentence. The short story was very descriptive, which was very important to that writing style. It talked about every little detail of each of the times that Dominicus met a man on the road. There is a youthful hero in the story, which can be seen in Dominicus, because he shows youthful characteristics. He shows some immaturity and the need for attention, but he also learns his lesson at the end of the story and was incredibly brave when he was saving Mr. Higginbotham. Hawthorne used language that was not always necessary, but they added to the story because they allowed the reader to paint a mental picture of the scene and experience the story better. "Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe" is a very good story that showed many of the characteristics of Romanticism.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne had many things in his life that led him to write the way he did. He often wrote about the sins of humans and the guilt that they felt. He went for the darker side of stories, and that could have been because of some of his anscestors and their part in the Salem witch trials (Liukkonen). John Hawthorne, one of his father's ancestors, was one of the judges during the trials, and he helped to execute a number of people (Liukkonen). Hawthorne's father also died when Hawthorne was very young, and that could have affected his life in a number of ways (Liukkonen). He may not have had a good male role model, and he could have always wondered why and had other questions and become angry at the world. He could have always seen the bad side of things because he may have thought, since he had already had his father die, there was nothing left that could hurt him that much. He may have felt some of the guilt that the Puritans should have felt or the guilt that the people involved with the Salem witch trials should have felt. He may have felt that he needed to make up for. He also had a hard time getting his works published in the beginning of his career, which may have discouraged him and led him to work a lot harder on the rest of his works, making them quite a bit better (Liukkonen). Nathaniel Hawthorne endured many hardships in his life, and that helped shape his literary works.
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    war hero (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). He must
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    his home (My).(Hawthorne, "My"). "My Low
    Nathaniel Hawthorne was a very good author of Dark Romanticism, and many people base their works off of his writing style. He wrote very descriptive stories that covered a broad variety of topics, but he chose to emphasize the negative side of human nature. He drew heavily off of his life experiences and the stories of his ancestors, and he tried to get rid of the hypocrisy so commonly evident in mankind. He wanted to expose people for who they really were, and he was not afraid to base a story off of one of man's worst characters. He wrote many incredibly interesting works, that are still as relevant and important now as they were when he wrote them.
    Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe." Free Classic Books Online at Classic Reader. Web. 06 Dec. 2010. <http://www.classicreader.com/book/197/1/>.
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  4. page The Sleeper by Edgar Allan Poe edited ... Irene, with her Destinies (Poe)! In this excerpt from Poe's piece, The Sleeper, the author's …
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    Irene, with her Destinies (Poe)!
    In this excerpt from Poe's piece, The Sleeper, the author's effective language and imagery is displayed (Poe). Poe is known for displaying a vivid description of his characters and the environment in which these infatuating characters inhabit. The excerpt uses eerie vocabulary in order to obtain this strong imagery. With words such as "mystic moon and opiate vapor," readers can retain a more spiritually connect perspective of Edgar Allan Poe (Poe). This spiritual connection is a common usage in Romanticist pieces. Edgar Allan Poe, falling into a more Dark Romanticist category, uses this spiritual connection as well as a strong use of abnormal and eerie imagery. To convey this dark Romanticist guideline, Poe uses language such as "grave, rest, slumber, and lies" (Poe). This vocabulary effectively conveys Poe's intentions and quota of writing a dark Romanticist piece. In a more spiritual relation, Poe uses the connection with a higher power to speak of the woman in the dress. After this use of spiritual connection, Poe refers back to a strong use of imagery and dark vocabulary. "My love, she sleeps! Oh, may her sleep. As it is lasting, so be deep! Soft may the worms about her creep!" (Poe) The statement is taken from The Sleeper as well. In this excerpt, the author uses eerie language to justify his dark stance in the literary community. This is a relative idea between most of Poe's individual literary pieces.
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    dark Romanticist piece.piece (Ricou). In the
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    altering literary community.community (Ricou). Poe retained
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    altering community.
    Werlock, Abby H. P., ed. "Poe, Edgar Allan." The Facts On File Companion to the American Novel. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2006. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&SID=5&iPin= CANov0736&SingleRecord=True (accessed December 9, 2010).

    Poe, Edgar Allan. "The Sleeper by Edgar Allan Poe." Edgar Allan Poe, Short Stories, Tales, and Poems. 2005. Web. 11 Dec. 2010. <http://poestories.com/read/sleeper>.
    Ricou, Laurie R. "Cohen, Leonard." World Book Advanced. World Book, 2011. Web. 4 Jan. 2011.
    Werlock, Abby H. P., ed. "Poe, Edgar Allan." The Facts On File Companion to the American Novel. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2006. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&SID=5&iPin= CANov0736&SingleRecord=True (accessed December 9, 2010).

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